3 Excellent Nootropics for Pain Relief

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3 Excellent Nootropics for Pain Relief

Noots for pain reliefNootropics can also trigger an analgesic effect. This is where nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen are used to treat acute pain. Taking a 400mg to 1200mg per day is estimated to be the analgesic ceiling.

Taking nootropics which trigger a dopamine release – the neurotransmitter released when your brain wants to condition an affinity for something – also produces an analgesic effect, so it makes sense that they are being used for pain relief, especially as they don’t carry the side-effects, notably depression and anxiety that many prescription pills do.

Take back pain for example – There is a theory that in general it may be caused by too much nervous system depression or fatigue/tension/anxiety leading supporting/stabilizing muscles to not be controlled properly.

Supplementing nootropics which boost brain function or remove anxiety can click the brain into a new mode of thinking where it has fuller control of the body.

 

green tick1. Tianeptine

Tianeptine has nootropic tendencies in that its MOA (mechanism of actions) is really very different to prescription pain relievers or antidepressants as it has the potential to quell anxiety, depression and pain without impairing cognition.

Standard antidepressants may impair cognitive health so something that can help without any treatment effects like Tianeptine may offer an alternative course of action plus there is evidence from user experience online that Tianeptine is both a well-tolerated effective anxiolytic and fast acting antidepressant, that can improve cognition in afflicted patients, so it may help when stress and anxiety levels go through the roof.

Back to tianeptine as a pain reliever though, it is not an opiate but an opioid, in that it binds to the opiate receptor and may make a potent painkiller in sufficient dose.

Note: Tianeptine does hold a propensity for abuse.

 

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2. Noopept

Some nootropics work by stimulating the release of dopamine from the pre-frontal cortex, subsequently increasing dopamine levels and more often enhancing your mood.

Noopept as evidence supports, is a potent anxiolytic and an excellent nootropic. Two hundred times more potent than aniracetam, lasting up to 5 or 6 hours, 2 to 3 hours more than aniracetam, noopept is a peptide piracetam derivative that increases serotonin and dopamine levels in the brain.

Noopept though has a mixed response from users online so it may work better in a stack when it comes to relieving pain.

 

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3. Alpha GPC & Piracetam

Alpha-GPC seems to increase the brain chemical acetylcholine – important for memory and learning functions – and is used in the treatment of dementia, stroke and mini-strokes.

Piracetam increases cerebral blood flow so repairing the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) as opposed to Central Nervous System damage is more achievable as the brain can repair itself to some extent, so when faced with back pain or joint pain, while nootropics won’t directly fix the problem, Piracetam seems to target the neuropathic pain.

Piracetam is probably best served though to treat neuro-disorders as mentioned plus for neuroprotection and brain aging.

Nootropics for Joint Pain

Many athletes often take a Ginkgo supplement to ease chronic muscle and joint pain and Cissus Quadrangularis normally referred to as simply “cissus” has anti-inflammatory properties and is used for joint pain along with SAM-e – S-adenosyl methionine which also stimulates an analgesic effect like ibuprofen.

 

Source:

https://www.reddit.com/r/Nootropics/comments/2sokf2/tianeptine_noopept_amp_citrate_and_alpha_gpc/

Comments

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2 Comments
  1. I dont think tianeptine should be on the list. It is very abusable and creates effects similar to hydrocodone at higher dosages. I think phenylpiracetam should be #1. Other than that i totally agree with the list!

  2. It is true Tianeptine holds a propensity for abuse which I have failed to list in this article so I will update – thanks for pointing this out!

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